Courses

Current Courses

Essentials of Glyobiology
(MED 225/CHEM 237/BIOM 222/BGGN 236/CMM 225)

glycobiology concepts

An overview of fundamental facts, concepts, and methods in glycobiology. The course is structured around major themes in the field, supported by selected readings from the textbook, “Essentials of Glycobiology” and original literature. Background information is provided through brief lectures, with detailed discussion of classic or current papers. Grading is based on regular attendance, class participation, and a take-home written essay on a topical issue in glycobiology.
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Current Literature in Glycobiology
(MED 246/BIOM 246/CMM 246)

cellular biology models

A forum for informal discussion of current papers in glycobiology research.
Topics include glycan chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, and molecular biology. Systems include animals, plants, microbes, and medical aspects of glycobiology. Typically, 20-25 students, post-docs, and faculty attend on a weekly basis.
Taught with: Jeffrey D. Esko, Ajit Varki, and Lars Bode.
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Current Topics in Anthropogeny
(BIOM 218)

CARTA symposia

Students participate in CARTA symposia three times per year at UCSD and/or the Salk Institute (see Symposia). Students are introduced to speakers via e–mail prior to the symposia and encouraged to read about the speakers' research. Each student shadows one of the speakers and attends the symposium talks. Students also write a summary of the speaker’s presentation and ensuing discussion.
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Introduction to Anthropogeny
(BIOM 225)

research into human origins

This course provides an overview of key areas in anthropogeny and the current state of research into human origins. This lecture series introduces graduate students participating in the Anthropogeny specialization, as well as other interested graduate students, to the key questions motivating ongoing research into human origins.
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Advanced Anthropogeny
(BIOM 229)

DESCRIPTION

A course during which the diverse group of students is immersed in the full breadth of the scope of Anthropogeny. The CARTA online Matrix of Comparative Anthropogeny (MOCA) will serve as a partial scaffold for this second course. This informal database consists of 24 different domains of knowledge grouping over 500 different topics. Each Topic addresses a uniquely human trait.
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Anthropogeny Field Course
(ANTH 289S)

Anthropogeny Field Course

This course exposes graduate students in the Anthropogeny track firsthand to the three major approaches anthropologists take to studying the origin and adaptations of our species: fossil evidence, comparison with non-humans, and study of human foragers living in environments similar to those in which we evolved. Underlying all three approaches is an appreciation for the importance of the ecological context of human adaptation. Visits to key sites are combined with lectures, discussion and at Ugalla, brief training/experience in conducting relevant field research.
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Past Courses

Reading Group Workshop: Glycobiology and Medicine
(SOM 204)

Glycobiology Workshop logo

Glycosylation, the post-translational modification of proteins and lipids with oligosaccharide chains (glycans), plays many important roles throughout the human life cycle. Glycans are involved in fertilization, gestation, development, disease susceptibility, immune regulation, inflammation and cancer. We consider how the appreciation of glycosylation will contribute to a better understanding of human disease: ranging from inborn errors of glycan metabolism to immune reactions against “non-self glycans”, and susceptibility to infectious disease. Glycans provide some classical drugs such as heparin and are also becoming an important aspect of new vaccine and drug design.


First Latin American Field Course in Primate Conservation Biology
March, 2003

Primate Conservation Biology

This field course was taught with Eduardo Fernandez Duque, Claudia Valleggio and Anthony DiFiore in Guaycolec, Formosa, Argentina. It consisted of lectures and practical field work on local owl monkeys. It also included molecular biology using a portable laboratory allowing DNA extraction and PCR for genotyping.



Second Latin American Field Course in Primate Conservation Biology,
April 2004

Primate Conservation Biology

This field course was taught with Eduardo Fernandez Duque, and Anthony DiFiore in Guaycolec, Formosa, Argentina. It consisted of lectures and practical field work on local owl monkeys. It also included molecular biology using a portable laboratory allowing DNA extraction and PCR for genotyping. Students were also taught various methods of sample collecting and safe canopy access techniques.