V. Robin Weersing, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, San Diego State University, Department of Psychology

Contact Information

robin.weersing@mail.sdsu.edu

Biography

Dr. Weersing is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at San Diego State University, a faculty member in the UCSD/SDSU Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology, and the Director of the Child and Adolescent Anxiety and Mood Program (ChAAMP), a treatment research center dedicated to improving mental health care for youth anxiety and depression.

Research Interests

  • Psychotherapy effectiveness
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Developmental psychopathology

Publications

  • Gonzalez, A., Weersing, V. R., Warnick, E. M., Scahill, L. D., & Woolston, J. L. (2012). Cross-ethnic measurement equivalence of the SCARED in an outpatient sample of African American and Non-Hispanic White youths and parents. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 41, 361-369. 
  • Weersing, V. R., Rozenman, M., Maher-Bridge, M., & Campo, J. (2012). Anxiety, depression, and somatic distress: Developing a transdiagnostic toolbox for pediatric practice. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 19, 68-82.
  • Gonzalez, A., Weersing, V. R., Warnick, E. M., Scahill, L. D., & Woolston, J. L. (2011). Predictors of treatment attrition among an outpatient clinic sample of youths with clinically significant anxiety. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 38, 356-367. 
  • Warnick, E. M., Gonzalez, A., Weersing, V. R., Scahill, L., & Woolston, J. L. (2011). Defining dropout from youth psychotherapy: How definitions shape the prevalence and predictors of attrition. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 17, 76-85.
  • Rozenman, M., Weersing, V. R., & Amir, N. (2011). A case series of attention modification in clinically-anxious youths. Behavior Research and Therapy, 49, 324-330.

Current Projects

5R01MH084935-05 (NIMH) Brief CBT for Pediatric Anxiety and Depression in Primary Care

5R01MH100260-02 (NIMH) Family Cognitive Behavioral Prevention of Depression in Youth and Parents