Welcome to the Rana Lab

Dr. Tariq Rana is a scholar, inventor, entrepreneur, and multidisciplinary scientist who is developing new therapies to treat infectious disease, cancer, and immune disorders. He is a Professor and Chief of Genetics, V/C for Innovation in Therapeutics, Department of Pediatrics at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, where his laboratory employs mechanisms and technologies of RNA, stem cells, and chemical biology to discover new pathways implicated in human disease.

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To launch clinical trials for ground-breaking immunotherapies for cancer and HIV/AIDS, as well as drugs for treatment of glioblastoma and viral infections...

Pharma Partners

 

Location


University of California San Diego

Biomedical Research Facility II

9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093

ranaoffice@ucsd.edu



 

About the Lab

New Approaches to Immunotherapies

We are a multidisciplinary laboratory focused on discovering fundamental mechanisms of RNA biology that regulate the immune response to viral infections and cancer, and the host response to immunotherapy. We are located in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. The lab is also associated with the Division of Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Institute for Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, Center for Drug Discovery Innovation, and the Biomedical Sciences Program of UCSD. 


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Opportunities


Featured News

An Atlas of Immune Cell Exhaustion in HIV-Infected Individuals Revealed by Single-Cell Transcriptomics


DNA that doesn't encode genes may still influence inflammatory and infectious disease                                             risk.

Editing genes one by one throughout colorectal cancer cell genome uncovers new drug targets.


Understanding HIV Genome Methylation.


Scientists Grow Mini Brains to Figure Out Why Zika Causes Microencephaly. 


MicroRNA Specifically Kills Cancer Cells with Common Mutation. 


Researchers unlock mystery of how Zika spreads in human cells.