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Upcoming Center Seminars

Date:

Monday September 28 2020, from 10:00am to 11:00am.

Location:

Online Only Zoom Meeting 
Password: 614964

Speaker:

Ruth Ley, PhD
Director, Department of Microbiome Science
Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology
Tübingen, Germany

Title:

THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN HOST GENETICS AND THE HUMAN GUT MICROBIOT

Speaker’s Research Interests: Dr. Ley’s research focuses on the symbiosis between the microbiome and human host through a genetic approach to identify microbiota with key roles in the host-microbiome relationship, which is then interrogated for their molecular underpinnings in animal and in-vitro models. Dr. Ley’s laboratory has identified a specific suite of microbes that are responsive to differences in human host genotype. Using a large population of genotyped and phenotyped human twin pairs, bacteria and archaea have been identified whose variation in abundance across the population was partially attributable to host genotype. These heritable microbes have been utilized as quantitative traits in genome-wide associations to identify human genes linked to the variation in the abundances of heritable microbiota. This approach revealed heritable microbiota, whose relationship with the host being studied in mechanistic detail by building intentional communities in vitro and in vivo.
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Date:

Monday October 26 2020, from 10:00am to 11:00am.

Location:

Online Only Zoom Meeting
Password: 775071

Speaker:

Fredrik Bäckhed, PhD
Professor
University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Gothenburg, Sweden 

Title:

GUT MICROBIOTA AND ITS EFFECTS ON TYPE 2 DIABETES

Speaker’s Research Interests: Professor Fredrik Bäckhed is an expert in cellular microbiology and mouse physiology.  The overall aim of Dr. Bäckhed's research is to clarify the role of bacteria associated with the human body in the development of metabolic diseases, with particular emphasis on diabetes, steatosis, and atherosclerosis as well as delineating whether altered gut microbiota contributes to the beneficial effects of bariatric surgery. The translational approach that involves human cohorts, is utilized to identify differences in microbial communities associated with the body in disease states and germ-free mice to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms promoted by specific bacteria. He trained as postdoc in Dr. Jeffrey Gordon's laboratory at Washington University.
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Date:

Monday November 30 2020, from noon to 1:00pm.

Location:

Online Only (Zoom information to be announced)

Speaker:

Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD
Robert H. Ebert Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School 
Jules L. Dienstag, MD and Betty and Newell Hale Endowed Chair in Gastroenterology
Chief of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital 
HMS Director, Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences & Technology
Advisory Dean, Irving M. London Society
Boston, MA

Title:

TBA

Speaker’s Research Interests:  Dr. Goessling’s laboratory studies regulators of liver development to explore endodermal progenitor cell specification, organ differentiation, and growth.  The main focus of the research is to understand the signals that indicate organ injury and regulate growth and regeneration. The inability to recover from acute injury can lead to organ failure, while a dysregulated regenerative response in the setting of chronic injury may contribute to cancer formation. Zebrafish is investigated as the primary model to discover novel regulatory pathways of liver development and evaluate their importance for recovery after toxic and physical injury. ______________________________________________________________________________________________

Date:

Monday December 14 2020, from noon to 1:00pm.

Location:

Online Only (Zoom information to be announced)

Speaker:

Vincent B. Young, MD/PhD
William Henry Fitzbutler Collegiate Professor
The University of Michigan
Department of Internal Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
Department of Microbiology & Immunology
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Title:

TBA

Speaker’s Research Interests:  Dr. Young’s lab focuses on understanding the role of bacteria that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and how they influence the health status of the host. The role of what would traditionally be considered “pathogenic bacteria” in gastrointestinal illness is studied, with a particular emphasis on Clostridium difficile. How the population structure of the indigenous GI microbiota can influence the host-pathogen interaction and how changes in the community structure of the indigenous microbiota itself can lead to pathogenic states is examined. This research is being conducted both with material from human subjects as well as animal models of disease.