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Upcoming Center Seminars

Date:

Wednesday, February 22, 2023, 12:00 - 1:00 pm, PT

Location:

Leichtag - 107 (Lecture Room)
Online: Zoom Meeting
Password: 915844

Speaker:

John J. Lemasters, MD, PhD 
Professor and GlaxoSmithKline Distinguished Endowed Chair
Director, Center for Cell Death, Injury & Regeneration 
Departments of Drug Discovery & Biomedical Sciences and Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Medical University of South Carolina
Charleston, SC

Title:
Role of Aldehydes and Mitochondria in the Progression of Alcohol-associated and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

Speaker’s Research Interests: Dr. Lemasters has a long-standing interest in the role of mitochondrial metabolism in hepatopathobiology, especially in relation to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, ethanol/drug-induced hepatic injury, liver preservation for transplantation, cancer, and mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy). Dr. Lemasters’ lab examines and supports the novel hypotheses that closure of voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) in the mitochondrial outer membrane accounts for global mitochondrial suppression consistent with a role for VDAC as a dynamic regulator, or governator, of mitochondrial function both in health and disease. Moreover, a switch from electrogenic to non-electrogenic mitochondrial ATP/ADP exchange in proliferating cancer cells leads to lower cytosolic ATP/ADP ratios and stimulation of aerobic glycolysis.


Date:

Monday, March 27, 2023, 12:00 - 1:00 pm, PT

Location:

Leichtag - 107 (Lecture Room)

Speaker:

Yasmine Belkaid, PhD 
Director NIAID Microbiome program
Co-Director NIH Center for Human Immunology
Chief Metaorganism Immunology Section
Chief Laboratory of Host Immunity and Microbiome
Bethesda, MD

Title:

TBD

Speaker’s Research Interests: Dr. Belkaid’s laboratory aims to understand the mechanisms controlling host-microbe interactions at barrier sites such as the skin and the gut. These two sites represent the first portal of pathogen exposure and are major anatomical sites for the development of inflammatory disorders. The skin and the gut also represent highly specialized environments with distinct structures, cell types, and innate defense mechanisms tailored to support their individual challenges. These include their exposure to factors from the outside environment, dietary antigens, and antigens derived from resident commensals. In particular, all barrier surfaces are covered by diverse and abundant microbiota that play a dominant role in host physiology and immunity. However, this symbiotic relationship also poses a constant threat to the host, and aberrant reactivity against commensals can lead to life-threatening tissue damage. These conflicting pressures present the host system that defends the skin or the gut with unique challenges: tolerating constant exposure to innocuous antigens while simultaneously maintaining the capacity to rapidly respond to encounters with pathogens.

Date:

Monday, April 24, 2023, 12:00 - 1:00 pm, PT

Location:

Leichtag - 107 (Lecture Room)

Speaker:

Rebecca Wells, MD
Professor of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA

Title:

TBD

Speaker’s Research Interests: The Wells lab is interested in the relationship between the extracellular matrix, mechanics, and cell and tissue behavior in the liver and biliary disease. Dr. Wells is interested in determining the role of mechanics in the progression of fatty liver disease to fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, in particular, the role of lipid droplets as mechanical stressors and the role of fatty liver-specific tissue-level mechanical stresses. In addition, she is researching mechanisms of injury and repair in biliary atresia and other cholangiopathies.

Date:

Monday, May 22, 2023, 12:00 - 1:00 pm, PT

Location:

Leichtag - 107 (Lecture Room)

Speaker:

Andreas J. Bäumler, PhD
Professor and Vice-Chair of Research
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology
University of California Davis School of Medicine
Davis, CA

Title:

TBD

Speaker’s Research Interests: Dr. Bäumler's lab has a long-standing history of pioneering new models and approaches to address key questions about the pathogenesis of infectious gastroenteritis. He particularly studies the molecular mechanisms of Salmonella infection, immunity to Salmonella, and the interactions between the host, pathogen and the intestinal microbiota during infection. The current key interest of Dr. Baeumler's laboratory is in mechanisms that lower colonization resistance against Enterobacteriaceae. Through their investigation, they could demonstrate that antibiotic treatment and inflammatory host response selectively enhance the growth of commensal Enterobacteriaceae through sugar oxidation and by generating respiratory electron acceptors. These findings have broad implications for understanding the mechanisms contributing to dysbiosis.