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Upcoming Center Seminars

Date:

Monday, November 30, 2020, from noon to 1:00 pm, Canceled.

Speaker:

Wolfram Goessling, MD, PhD
Robert H. Ebert Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School 
Jules L. Dienstag, MD and Betty and Newell Hale Endowed Chair in Gastroenterology
Chief of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital 
Boston, MA

Title: 

Liver Regeneration: Fate and Function

Speaker’s Research Interests:  Dr. Goessling’s laboratory studies regulators of liver development to explore endodermal progenitor cell specification, organ differentiation, and growth.  The main focus of the research is to understand the signals that indicate organ injury and regulate growth and regeneration. The inability to recover from acute injury can lead to organ failure, while a dysregulated regenerative response in the setting of chronic injury may contribute to cancer formation. Zebrafish is investigated as the primary model to discover novel regulatory pathways of liver development and evaluate their importance for recovery after toxic and physical injury. ______________________________________________________________________________________________

Date:

Monday, December 14, 2020, from noon to 1:00 pm.

Location:

Online Only (Zoom Meeting)
Password: 248851

Speaker:

Vincent B. Young, MD, PhD
William Henry Fitzbutler Collegiate Professor
The University of Michigan
Department of Internal Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
Department of Microbiology & Immunology
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Title:

TBA

Speaker’s Research Interests:  Dr. Young’s lab focuses on understanding the role of bacteria that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract and how they influence the health status of the host. The role of what would traditionally be considered “pathogenic bacteria” in gastrointestinal illness is studied, with a particular emphasis on Clostridium difficile. How the population structure of the indigenous GI microbiota can influence the host-pathogen interaction and how changes in the community structure of the indigenous microbiota itself can lead to pathogenic states is examined. This research is being conducted both with material from human subjects as well as animal models of disease.