Seminars

​SDCPI presents:

The La Jolla Institute for Immunology & Southampton Immuno-Oncology Summit

 

Place:  La Jolla Institute for Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA  92037

Date/Time:  Monday, February 25th 9:30am-5:30pm and Tuesday, Februray 26th 9:30am-5:30pm
 

Program Monday, February 25th
9:30am-10:00am Check-in and Networking
10:00am-12:30pm Presentations and Q&A
12:30pm-1:30pm Lunch and Networking
1:30pm-3:30pm Presentations and Q&A
3:30pm-4:00pm Break and Networking
4:00pm-5:30pm Presentations and Discussion

Program Tuesday, February 26th
9:30am-10:00am Check-in and Networking
10:00am-12:30pm Presentations and Q&A
12:30pm-1:30pm Lunch and Networking
1:30pm-3:30pm Presentations and Q&A
3:30pm-4:00pm Break and Networking
4:00pm-5:30pm Presentations and Discussion



Hosted by Stephen Schoenberger, PhD, Ezra Cohen, MD, and Tim Elliott, PhD


Southampton Speakers: Professor Tim Elliott, Professor of Experimental Oncology; Professor Christian Ottensmeier, Professor of Experimental Medicine; Mark Cragg, Professor in Experimental Cancer Research; Edd James, Associate Professor Experimental Oncology; Ali Roghanian, Lecturer in Cancer Immunotherapy; John Holloway, Associate Dean Research & Professor of Allergy and Respiratory Genetics; Tilman Sanchez-Elsner, Associate Professor in Biomedical Sciences

San Diego Speakers:  Aaron M. Miller, MD, PhD; Ananda Goldrath, PhD; Hannah Carter, PhD; Susan Kaech, PhD; Sonia Sharma, PhD; Linda Bradley, PhD; Bjoern Peters, PhD; Amnon Altman, PhD.

Information on The University of Southampton
 
No cost to attend. Carpooling is suggested. Parking is limited.
Kindly REGISTER by Wednesday, February 20, 2019. 

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Thank you to our Partnering Sponsors:  Fate Therapeutics and Thermo Fisher Scientific

Speaker Profiles:

Dr. Altman received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the University of Tel Aviv in Israel, and his Ph.D. in 1975 from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel. Between 1975-78, Dr. Altman underwent postdoctoral training at the National Cancer Institute, NIH, and later at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation (SCRF). By 1978, he had been appointed to an Assistant Member position in the Departments of Cellular and Developmental Immunology, Molecular Immunology and Immunology at SCRF. From 1984 to 1990, he served as an Associate Member in the Department of Immunology at SCRF. Upon his move to the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) in 1990, Dr. Altman assumed his current position of Professor and Head, Division of Cell Biology, and between 2010-2018 he also served as Director of Scientific Affairs at LJI. His work focuses on elucidating the signal transduction pathways that result in T cell activation, and translating this knowledge for the future benefit of patients with immunological diseases and cancer. His lab recently discovered and characterized a novel regulatory T cell (Treg)-intrinsic signaling pathway that operates in both mice and humans, and is required for contact-dependent Treg suppression of tumor immunity. Supported by funding from the NCI and an industrial partner, current work in Dr. Altman's lab aims at determining how best to utilize this signaling pathway, in combination with other therapeutic modalities, to treat preclinical models of cancer, with a view toward future translation to human cancer.  
​Amnon Altman, PhD
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Topic:
A Novel Treg-Intrinsic Signaling Pathway and Its Application to Human Cancer Immunotherapy
The research program in the Bradley Lab is focused on understanding the regulation of T lymphocytes in virus infections where the immune response results in viral clearance and the development of immunologic memory, and in chronic virus infections where the ongoing immune response leads to viral persistence and immune dysregulation. We are guided by these studies to interrogate cellular mechanisms that can be modulated to promote better responses not only to virus infections, but also to relieve immune inhibition in the setting of cancer where T cells progressively lose function and become ‘exhausted’.

A current focus of research is on PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein-1), a cell surface protein that can initiate the process of T cell migration from the blood into tissue. We have found that this receptor has a fundamental role as a T cell intrinsic immune checkpoint inhibitor that regulates the magnitude of TCR signaling, and impacts the activation of naive T cells as well as the metabolic program and survival of effector T cells, and their formation memory cells. In addition, signaling through PSGL-1 promotes T cell exhaustion in the settings of chronic virus infections and melanoma, and deletion or blockade of this protein prevents the development of exhausted T cells, leading to viral clearance and tumor growth control. As such, our ongoing studies of this immune checkpoint regulator using in vivo models indicate that PSGL-1 is a promising therapeutic target to enhance T cell responses to infections and cancer as well as to inhibit T cell responses in autoimmunity. We are actively pursuing translational studies with the UCSD Moores Cancer Center to analyze PSGL-1-dependent regulation in human T cells in an effort to enhance patient responses to their tumors and are working to develop biologics for treatment of patients with cancer and autoimmunity.

Dr. Bradley received her PhD in Immunology from the University of California, Berkeley, and did her postdoctoral training at the University of California, San Diego with Dr. Susan Swain. She joined the Department of Immunology at the Scripps Research Institute in 1996, and has been a Professor at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute since 2009, where she is currently the Director of the Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Immunology Program.

​Linda Bradley, PhD
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Topic:

Checkpoint regulation of T cells in infections and cancer


The Carter Lab uses computation to study the impact of cancer-associated DNA mutations on intracellular biological processes and cellular behaviors. Current projects focus on identifying variation that contributes to cancer predisposition or that can be exploited for cancer therapy. Dr. Carter is an Azrieli Global Scholar, a Siebel Scholar and a recipient of a 2013 NIH Director's Early Independence Award.
Hannah Carter, PhD
University of California, San Diego

Topic:
MHC genotype shapes the oncogenic landscape

Mark Cragg is Professor of Experimental Cancer Biology in the Cancer Sciences Unit of Southampton University Faculty of Medicine. He obtained his PhD in 1998 and did his postdoctoral studies in Southampton with Martin Glennie and Melbourne, Australia with Andreas Strasser before returning to the UK to start his own group in 2007.  His research concerns how therapeutics result in tumour regression with a focus on antibodies and small molecules. The aim is to understand how these therapeutics delete tumour cells, how resistance occurs and how it might be overcome. Over the last decade, he has investigated many different therapeutic reagents such as rituximab, bexxar, imatinib, gefitinib, cetuximab and tarceva and has been involved in the development of next generation antibody reagents such as ofatumumab and obinutuzumab, as well as first in class novel antibodies such as BI-1206. Throughout the strategy undertaken is highly translational with iterative cycling between in vitro experiments, appropriate in vivo model systems and primary clinical material. He sits on the advisory board for several charities and institutes and has published over 140 research papers.
​Mark Cragg, PhD
University of Southampton

Topic:
Successful determinants of Antibody Immunotherapy
Edd is an Associate Professor in Cancer Immunology at the University of Southampton. He completed his PhD in the lab of Elizabeth Simpson at Imperial College London on the tolerisation of T cells to minor histocompatibility antigens in transplantation. As a Wellcome Trust travelling fellow he moved into the field of antigen processing and presentation in the lab of Nilabh Shastri at the University of California at Berkeley examining the sources of antigenic peptides presented at the cell surface. Upon return to the UK he established a lab at the University of Southampton. His current research addresses fundamental questions about how antigens are processed for presentation on MHC class I molecules in disease. The primary focus of this work is the endoplasmic reticulum resident aminopeptidases ERAP1 and ERAP2, which play a crucial role in defining the repertoire of peptides available for MHC class I loading and cell surface presentation. Recently, particular polymorphisms within both ERAP1 and ERAP2 have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. We have shown that ERAP1 is highly polymorphic in humans and are currently investigating the role of these polymorphic ERAP1 allotypes in disease. We are also investigating how modulation of ERAP1/2 function can be used to promote protective anti-tumour responses in vivo.

James Edd, PhD
University of Southampton

Topic:

Immune Dysfunction: the role of polymorphic ERAP1 in disease

Tim Elliott left the University of Oxford with a first in Biochemistry in 1983 and completed his PhD in cancer immunotherapy at the University of Southampton in 1986. He did his postdoctoral training at MIT with Herman Eisen at the Center for Cancer Research. In 1990 he returned to the University of Oxford to join the Institute for Molecular Medicine as a Wellcome Trust Research Fellow, joining a key group of immunologists studying antigen presentation at the molecular level: where he continues to be a world leader with over 130 research articles on the subject. In 1993 he was appointed to a lectureship and later a Professorship at Balliol College, University of Oxford, as a Wellcome Trust Senior Fellow in Basic Biomedical Science. In 2000, he moved to the University of Southampton as Professor of Experimental Oncology and five years later became Associate Dean for the Faculty of Medicine. In 2015 he stepped down from this role to take up Directorship of the new Southampton Centre for Cancer Immunology which will open in 2018. He is a Deputy Director of the interdisciplinary Southampton Institute for Life Sciences and a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences. He has incorporated discoveries in the areas of antigen processing, T cell regulation and immunodominance into the development of new cancer immunotherapies and is the recipient of a Royal Society/Wolfson Research Merit Award.

​Tim Elliott, PhD
University of Southampton

Topic:

Mechanistic models for the MHC I antigen processing pathway

Ananda Goldrath is a Professor and Chair of the Molecular Biology Section in the Division of Biological Sciences at the University of California, San Diego where she joined the faculty in 2004, and is a Pew Scholar and Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Fellow. She trained with Professor Michael Bevan in the Department of Immunology at the University of Washington for her graduate studies and Professors Diane Mathis and Christophe Benoit at the Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School for her postdoctoral studies. Her work has contributed to the understanding of transcriptional regulation of T cell activation, differentiation and homeostasis. Dr. Goldrath’s current research focuses on investigating new ways to induce the immune system to provide protection from infections and eradicate malignancies.

Immunological memory ensures that, once infected by a particular virus or bacteria, individuals are generally protected from a second encounter with that same pathogen. This ability of lymphocytes to “remember” is the basis for protection following vaccination. Little is known about the signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms that regulate the formation and maintenance of memory T cell numbers and functional capacity.

The goal of our research is to understand how T cell memory is generated and maintained by identifying the transcriptional and signaling events that regulate the survival and differentiation of T cells as they navigate the immune response and become long-lived memory T cells.

​Ananda Goldrath, PhD
University of California, San Diego

Topic:

T cell immunity to infection and tumors

John Holloway is originally from New Zealand where he graduated from Otago University and undertook his PhD in the Malaghan Institute. He is now Associate Dean (Research) and Professor of Allergy and Respiratory Genetics in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, UK and his research program focuses on genetics, epigenetics and functional genomics of allergic and respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD. His current research includes exploring the mechanisms of prenatal programming of respiratory disease and epigenetic mechanisms underlying atopy and asthma susceptibility; gene-environment interactions in the early life origins of asthma and COPD; characterisation of genetic factors influencing asthma severity; and identification and validation of novel asthma susceptibility genes. His work involves significant international collaboration with major research partners in the Universities of Groningen (NL), Memphis and Michigan State (USA), Bergen (NOR) and Melbourne (AUS). Professor Holloway has published extensively in the field of allergy and respiratory genetics and details of his publications and research can be found
John Holloway, PhD
University of Southampton

Topic:
An introduction to the Faculty of Medicine
Susan Kaech is a Salk Institute Professor, Director of the NOMIS Center for Immunobiology and Microbial Pathogenesis, and holder of the NOMIS Chair.  Prior to this she was a Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor at Yale University in the Department of Immunobiology (2004–2018).  Dr. Kaech did her postdoctoral work with Dr. Rafi Ahmed at Emory University (1999–2004) and received her PhD in Developmental Biology at Stanford University. She received her BS in Cellular and Molecular Biology at the University of Washington.
            Dr. Kaech aims to understand how memory T cells are produced during infection and vaccination, how they function and why in some particular cases, they fail to induce long-term immunity. Her lab has been a leader in using genetic and molecular tools to identify the genes and signaling molecules involved in generating two specific types of memory T cells, CD4 and CD8, from precursor cells during both acute and chronic viral infections. She and her team discovered more than half a dozen important regulatory genes, as well as several types of key molecules called cytokines, which influence memory T cell development.
            Dr. Kaech is also interested in how T cells are metabolically regulated, and how their differentiation and function can be altered by nutrient availability during infection and in tumors. In particular, she seeks to learn how T cell behavior is suppressed by tumors, in order to create better therapies for cancer using the body's own immune system—an innovative and rapidly moving field called cancer immunotherapy.
            Dr. Kaech has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Damon Runyon–Walter Winchell Cancer Research Fellowship (1999), the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences (2003), the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) (2007) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Early Career Scientist (2009).
​Susan Kaech, PhD
Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Topic:
Anti-tumor T cells - you are what you eat
Salah Mansour is Principal Research Fellow (Associate Professor) & group leader within Medicine at the University of Southampton. He leads a research group that employs a multidisciplinary approach investigating basic molecular mechanisms of lipid antigen presentation to unconventional T cells. His current research programme is focused on understanding the role of CD1 proteins and lipid antigens in T cell responses to tuberculosis infection and cancer. He has published in leading journals including PNAS, Nat Immunol, Science Immunol, eLife, and J Immunol.

Salah Mansour, PhD
University of Southampton

Topic:

CD1 mediated immune responses


Aaron M. Miller, MD, PhD, is a board-certified medical oncologist who specializes in diagnosing and treating gastrointestinal cancers. This includes cancers of the esophagus, gallbladder, liver, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, bowel and anus. He uses numerous forms of therapy such as chemotherapy, biological therapy, immunotherapy and targeted therapy to offer the best possible treatment options for his patients. Dr. Miller’s approach to care emphasizes personalized medicine/precision oncology, adoptive cellular therapy, next-generation tumor sequencing and tumor immunology. He is part of the gastrointestinal cancer unit at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health, where he works alongside a multidisciplinary team to provide patients with highly specialized care.

Dr. Miller is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine, where he instructs medical students, residents and fellows at UC San Diego School of Medicine. He holds a joint faculty appointment at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and is actively involved in cancer research, with the aim of translating his discoveries in the lab into new ways of treating patients.

Specifically, Dr. Miller’s research focuses on tumor neoantigen identification as targets for novel immunotherapeutics that are both effective and avoid off-tumor toxicities. He and his colleagues have also created a new patient-derived xenograft platform that allows for preclinical testing of investigational chemotherapeutics and immune therapies.

​Aaron M. Miller, MD, PhD
University of California, San Diego

Topic:

A functional approach to neoantigen identification in patients with solid malignancies

Christian Ottensmeier is Professor in Experimental Cancer Medicine. He graduated and began his training in Münster, Germany. After a 3 year training fellowship in the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, he moved to Southampton where he completed his oncology training and undertook his PhD. He has been a consultant in medical oncology since 2000.
Christian’s core academic interest is the early translation of immunotherapeutic strategies into the clinic. His clinical interests are thoracic malignancies and melanoma, and he has co-developed a number of national NCRI studies in lung cancer. He manages a broad and active portfolio of clinical trials in both lung cancer and melanoma.
The overarching aim of his laboratory group is the preclinical development and early phase clinical testing of strategies to induce anti-tumour immune responses in patients. His work focuses on three linked but distinct areas of investigation: Detailed immunological evaluation of the effect of immunological intervention in patients, assay development and validation, and mechanistic studies in murine models as well as human modelling of immune responses to vaccination for further cancer vaccine development.
He has served on a number of industry advisory boards and DSMBs for industry led studies and is also a member of the Clinical Development partnership between Cancer Research UK and Astra Zeneca. He is a member of a number of national peer reviewed funding committees.

​Christian Ottensmeier, PhD
University of Southampton

Topic:

Experience in collaborative working with the investigators in La Jolla

Dr. Bjoern Peters is a Professor at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) in the Division of Vaccine Discovery. His training included a Diploma degree in Physics at the University of Hamburg (Germany) awarded in 2000, and a PhD degree in Theoretical Biophysics at the Humboldt University in Berlin (Germany) in 2003. His PhD work in the group of Prof. Hermann-Georg Holzhuetter focused on developing and evaluating algorithms to predict how different molecular mechanisms impact what peptide epitopes are recognized by T cells. This work included visiting scientist stays in the labs of Prof. Zhiping Weng (Boston), and Hans-Georg Rammensee (Tuebingen). In 2004, Dr. Peters started postdoctoral training in the lab of Prof. Alessandro Sette at LJI, where he took on a leadership role in the development of the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB). The large volume of data in the IEDB enabled more precise evaluations of different epitope prediction algorithms as well as training of advanced machine learning algorithms. It also highlighted the need to develop more exact representations of scientific data curated from the literature, which led to Dr. Peters’ engagement in several ontology development efforts, notably the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations. Dr. Peters was promoted to Assistant Professor in 2008 and moved through the ranks to Full Professor with tenure in 2018. During this period, the Peters lab expanded its focus from a purely basic understanding of T cell epitope recognition to a broader mission of tackling disease-specific challenges in infections, allergies and cancer that can be addressed by the core competencies of the lab in adaptive immune recognition, large scale data analysis, and machine learning. 
Bjoern Peters, PhD
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Topic:
Predicting T cell epitopes
Ali Roghanian obtained a PhD degree in immunology from the University of Edinburgh in 2007. He has extensive experience of working with experimental models of disease, including humanised mouse models of cancer, as well as developing and testing novel therapeutics. Ali joined the University of Southampton (UoS) in 2009, where he was a lead scientist on a project on generating/characterising novel human FcγRIIB antibodies in collaboration with a biotech company (www.bioinvent.se); currently in Phase I/II clinical trials. He was subsequently awarded a highly competitive Visiting Fellowship to spend ~3 years at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, MIT (2015-17). In January 2018, Ali relocated to the UoS to establish his independent research group. Ali’s H-index is 20 (i10-index: 22) and he is a named inventor on two patents on therapeutic human FcγRIIB antibodies.
Ali Roghanian, PhD
University of Southampton

Topic:
Advances in modelling human cancers in humanized mice

Tilman has over 11 years of independent research experience in the areas of gene expression, microRNA and macrophage biology with an interest in respiratory diseases (lung cancer, asthma, COPD) as well as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD; Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn´s Disease).  Over the years, Tilman has studied the role of microRNAs in modulating gene expression and function in macrophages as well as T-Cells. His group discovered that dysregulation of networks in disease (asthma and IBD) modify the biology of macrophages and their ability to respond to infection and to interact with other cells (both immune cells, such as T-cells, and epithelial cells). In the past five years, Tilman has worked closely with Prof. Christian Ottensmeier and Dr Pandurangan Vijayanand in unravelling the transcriptomic regulation of macrophages, T-Cells, B-Cells and NK cells in lung cancer.  They have found striking evidence that macrophages (Tumour Associated, TAM) are key to recruit and maintain T-Cells and are now quite interested in establishing how this cross-talk can affect our ability to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapy drugs targeting T-Cells. Their goal is now to be able to manipulate TAMs in order to enhance the number and function of T-Cells in the tumour to boost immunotherapy in patients . They have published our microRNA, macrophage and T-Cell work in Nature Immunology, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical care medicine and The Journal of Immunology in the last two years.  They are interested in further exploring the role of microRNAs and transcriptomics in inflammatory diseases (IBD, asthma) and cancer.
Tilman Sanchez-Elsner, PhD
University of Southampton

Topic:
M1hot tumour associated macrophages boost tissue-resident memory T-cells infiltration and survival in human lung cancer

Dr. Sharma has an outstanding record of research accomplishments, including high impact discoveries published in top scientific journals. Her work has made her an internationally recognized expert in the use of high throughput, genome scale approaches, in particular RNA interference and CRISPR/Cas9, to dissect complex cellular signaling pathways and questions of immunological relevance. Her use of these technologies is a powerful tool that can be applied to any cellular pathway or disease process.

Dr. Sharma was instrumental in establishing the Institute’s Functional Genomics Center, which she currently directs, and she is channeling her expertise to further her own research program. Her work, particularly her studies of anti-viral and anti-tumor type 1 interferon signaling, which incorporates work with human genetics and biosamples, will be instrumental in understanding how genes contribute to human health and disease.

​Sonia Sharma, PhD
La Jolla Institute for Immunology


Topic:

Small molecule metabolite bio-modulators of ICB response



For questions:  sdcpi@ucsd.edu