CTRI Co-Produces Concussion Videos as Part of Health Research Series

August 18, 2016

Head injury and concussions are risks in many sports such as football, soccer, cheerleading and lacrosse. In the U.S., nearly 300,000 sports-related concussions are estimated to occur annually in high school athletes. UC San Diego Clinical and Translational Research Institute (CTRI) recently co-produced two videos about concussions that focus on research and knowing when a concussed individual is ready to return to the classroom and field.

Each video is about 3 minutes and among a list of education videos developed by the CTRI Community Engagement unit to help the community understand research and improve health throughout various stages of life. The videos, supported by the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, are posted on YouTube and linked on the CTRI website.

“One of our main goals with the concussion videos is to educate parents and students and to help viewers understand the importance of health research in the development of evidence-based practice,” said CTRI Community Engagement manager Rodney von Jaeger.

In the first concussion video, “After a concussion  – When is it OK to return to play and return to learn?” experts from the University of California, San Diego describe steps to follow after a player gets a concussion. In the second, “Concussion Research – How do we know what we know?” they discuss what research reveals so far about concussions. UC San Diego experts featured include David Bazzo, MD; Alan Shahtaji, DO; Sarah Linke, PhD, MPH; and Kevin Messey, MS, ATC (certified athletic trainer). In addition, Mira Mesa High School head coach Gary Blevins is featured.

The CTRI Community series also includes videos on basic research topics and concepts; what motivates specific communities to participate in research; and how health research provides useful information.

“One of the aims of the CTRI Community Engagement unit is to increase health research literacy and promote participation in health research,” said Howard Taras, MD, director of Community Engagement. “Working with our Community Advisory Board, we chose a video format to leverage media channels like YouTube and reach populations who prefer receiving information through videos. The goal was to develop videos that are quick, interesting and easy to understand.”

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