ACTRI-Supported Researcher Carter Receives CIFAR Scholarship

January 23, 2018

Hannah Carter, PhD

Computational biologist Hannah Carter, PhD, has been named a 2017 Azrieli Global Scholar by the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR). Carter, an assistant professor of medicine at UC San Diego in the Division of Genetics, is one of 15 early career researchers receiving the two-year appointment, which includes $100k in research support. Carter’s research focuses on computationally modeling how DNA mutations in tumor genomes impact intracellular biological processes and cellular behaviors, and how these cellular level changes cause cancer.

CIFAR will support the development of methods to uncover interactions between the inherited and tumor genomes. These interactions can provide insight into mechanisms of tumorigenesis and may be useful for identifying individuals at risk for cancer in the future. UC San Diego Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute (ACTRI) provided partial support for Carter when she joined the University in 2013.

“Early support from the ACTRI was instrumental to the initial development of this project. Now through CIFAR, I have the opportunity to work with world leaders in the genetic networks field to drive the project forward,” Carter said.

Carter received a PhD in biomedical engineering from the School of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University in 2012, is a recipient of the prestigious NIH Early Independence Award (2013) and is co-author on several publications, including a recent paper in the journal, Cell, titled, “MHC-I genotype restricts the oncogenic mutational landscape.”

To find out more about Carter and her research, visit her Profiles page and the CIFAR Carter page.

Hear Carter on a new podcast, “Minority Report” for cancer, produced by UC San Diego Health’s Communications team.


About UC San Diego Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute:

UC San Diego Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute (ACTRI) is part of a national Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium, led by the National Institutes of Health National Center for Advancing Translational Science. Established in 2010, ACTRI provides infrastructure and support for basic, translational and clinical research throughout the San Diego region to bring discoveries from the laboratory to the bedside, and facilitates training and education of the next generation of researchers. ACTRI carries out its activities in collaboration with institutional and corporate partners and currently has more than 1,500 members.

actri.ucsd.edu